Tuesday, July 05, 2005

IN MY IN BOX

How, I wonder, has “in box” escaped codification? It’s not in my Webster’s New World College Dictionary, the giant Webster’s Third New International Dictionary, the AP Stylebook or The New York Times’ Manual of Style and Usage.

And it certainly deserves an entry in at least one: A Google search shows 19 million uses of “inbox”; 21 million for “in-box”; and only 2.5 million for “in box,” the default for a two-part word that’s not listed.

5 comments:

eric said...

Very good example of why the AP Style Book has driven me nuts the last few years.

Can we just call high-definition television HDTV, yet?

Scape7 said...

Sure ... but I still loathe "cellphone."

Brian Wanamaker said...

I thought google ignored hyphens and such in searches. It sure seems to show non-hyphenated results even when I specify the hyphen. Weird-o.

Scape7 said...

I can't explain it. But they're certainly results that can be duplicated.

Brian Wanamaker said...

You're right that the results are different. I think it works out that the version with the hyphen includes the non-hyphenated results, but not vice-versa.